• June 21, 2017

    How Much Can We Charge? Using Gravity Models to Predict Feedstock Availability and Tip Fees for Biogas Project

    Clear understanding of the availability of feedstock and of the tip fees a new anaerobic digestion project can command is critical for developers and financiers. From a high level, it is possible to generate reliable estimates of feedstock generation in a region, but understanding what quantities of feedstock a project can expect to attract and the tip fees it can charge is a challenge

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  • June 9, 2017

    What is the cost of Cap & Trade on the Greenhouse Industry in Ontario?

    A significant cost portion for operating a greenhouse in Ontario is heating. With the new Cap & Trade program implemented on January 2017, the cost of heating with fossil fuel will rise. This white paper will help explain the cost of this Cap & Trade program and how this cost can be mitigated.

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  • June 1, 2017

    Why Should We Care About Supply Chain Analytics?

    Economic viability of bioenergy projects depends on de-risking feedstock supply. This white paper series helps explain the relevance of the latest developments in biomass supply chain research and analytics to industry developers and lenders. It serves as an introduction to important feedstock supply chain de-risking concepts: from risk analysis methods to actual procurement strategies.

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  • June 1, 2017

    Five Common Mistakes in Wood Procurement

    In 2011, a fortune 500 company purchased a large woody biomass combustor to heat and cool its factory in North Carolina. It expected to be able to utilize “typical hog fuel” or “whole tree chip”. The manufacturer confirmed the wood spec, and the company issued an RFQ to local wood suppliers. In the end, the project could only burn “clean paper quality” chip—the handling and conveying system kept blocking up. The ongoing premium to burn the higher grade wood chips is over $10 per ton or over $300,000 each and every year.

    These kinds of failures happen over and over in new bioenergy builds. It is a fact that the vast majority of bioenergy project failures occur due to feedstock related issues.

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